Put Post-9/11 GI Bill Benefits to Work for You, MilSpouses!

GI-Bill-Dependents

The Post-9/11 GI Bill is a great benefit for Service members and their families to help pay for college, a certification, or other types of training. The active duty or selected reserve Service member must transfer GI Bill benefits to his or her spouse and/or dependents while actively serving. New rules went into effect January 2020 regarding transferability. Don’t let this benefit go to waste, military spouses! Put Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits to work for you, today.

How Transferred Benefits Work for Spouses

GI Bill benefits for Service members, spouses and dependents have different features. The maximum benefit available is 36 months. Service members can transfer their unused GI Bill benefits to their military spouses or one or more of their children. Here is how transferred benefits work for spouses:

Transfer Approvals

  • Each branch of the military processes and approves benefits transfers for its Service members. Find more information from your branch and visit the DoD’s website milConnect.

How to Apply

  • You can begin using benefits immediately. Education benefits are managed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Click here to find more information on how to apply. The school or training program you plan to attend may also have a dedicated staff member to help you navigate this process.

Eligibility & Stipends

  • You can use benefits if your spouse is on active duty or separated from service.
  • You are not eligible to receive the monthly housing allowance if your spouse is on active duty while you are using the benefit. However, if your spouse is not on active duty, you are eligible to receive the monthly housing allowance. This amount is usually equal to the Base Allowance for Housing (BAH) for an E-5 with dependents and is based on the Zoning Improvement Plan (ZIP) code of your school. Click here for more information.
  • The maximum yearly stipend for books and supplies is $1,000.

Time Limits

  • Spouses can use benefits up to 15 years after the Service member separates from active duty. For spouses of Service members in the Reserves, the clock may restart with the completion of certain active duty orders.
  • Children may only use the benefit after receiving a high school diploma or equivalent, or after age 18 and before age 26.  In addition, benefits expire 10 years after the Service member separates from active duty.

Achieve Your Educational & Career Goals!

The Post-9/11 GI Bill can help service members and military families achieve their educational and career goals. Review your options and see how these educational benefits can help your family.

Are you ready to join the mission?

MilSpouse Money Mission™ is a Department of Defense resource that offers FREE personal financial education specifically geared toward spouses. There is a Money Ready guide for various stages of financial life, a MilLife Milestones section to help you through the big moments in your military journey, a blog, spouse videos, quizzes, calculators and more!

Join the mission to lead your family to a stronger financial future. Get started, here! Connect with us on social media and share this post.

Primary Text Separator for Milspouse Money Mission, Financial Education for Military Spouses

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Primary Text Separator for Milspouse Money Mission, Financial Education for Military Spouses
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GI-Bill-Dependents

The Post-9/11 GI Bill is a great benefit for Service members and their families to help pay for college, a certification, or other types of training. The active duty or selected reserve Service member must transfer GI Bill benefits to his or her spouse and/or dependents while actively serving. New rules went into effect January 2020 regarding transferability. Don’t let this benefit go to waste, military spouses! Put Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits to work for you, today.

How Transferred Benefits Work for Spouses

GI Bill benefits for Service members, spouses and dependents have different features. The maximum benefit available is 36 months. Service members can transfer their unused GI Bill benefits to their military spouses or one or more of their children. Here is how transferred benefits work for spouses:

Transfer Approvals

  • Each branch of the military processes and approves benefits transfers for its Service members. Find more information from your branch and visit the DoD’s website milConnect.

How to Apply

  • You can begin using benefits immediately. Education benefits are managed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Click here to find more information on how to apply. The school or training program you plan to attend may also have a dedicated staff member to help you navigate this process.

Eligibility & Stipends

  • You can use benefits if your spouse is on active duty or separated from service.
  • You are not eligible to receive the monthly housing allowance if your spouse is on active duty while you are using the benefit. However, if your spouse is not on active duty, you are eligible to receive the monthly housing allowance. This amount is usually equal to the Base Allowance for Housing (BAH) for an E-5 with dependents and is based on the Zoning Improvement Plan (ZIP) code of your school. Click here for more information.
  • The maximum yearly stipend for books and supplies is $1,000.

Time Limits

  • Spouses can use benefits up to 15 years after the Service member separates from active duty. For spouses of Service members in the Reserves, the clock may restart with the completion of certain active duty orders.
  • Children may only use the benefit after receiving a high school diploma or equivalent, or after age 18 and before age 26.  In addition, benefits expire 10 years after the Service member separates from active duty.

Achieve Your Educational & Career Goals!

The Post-9/11 GI Bill can help service members and military families achieve their educational and career goals. Review your options and see how these educational benefits can help your family.

Are you ready to join the mission?

MilSpouse Money Mission™ is a Department of Defense resource that offers FREE personal financial education specifically geared toward spouses. There is a Money Ready guide for various stages of financial life, a MilLife Milestones section to help you through the big moments in your military journey, a blog, spouse videos, quizzes, calculators and more!

Join the mission to lead your family to a stronger financial future. Get started, here! Connect with us on social media and share this post.

Team Member

We are team of financial professionals who understand military life because we have experienced military life. Our goal is to educate and empower military spouses to help them make smart money moves. We combine passion and expertise to ensure you get the most accurate and relevant information. Take comfort knowing Certified Financial Planner™ professionals, an Accredited Financial Counselor® and the Department of Defense Office of Financial Readiness have vetted the content on this site.

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Primary Text Separator for Milspouse Money Mission, Financial Education for Military Spouses

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Primary Text Separator for Milspouse Money Mission, Financial Education for Military Spouses
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